Find your Swedish Family
 

 

 

Do you, too, have family in Sweden?
When your grandparent boarded the ship for North America or Australia, perhaps he or she left brothers and sisters behind in Sweden. If so, their children and grandchildren, your Swedish relatives, might be wondering about you, wanting to find you, but not know how and where. The reality is that it's much easier for you to find them in Sweden than for them to find you.  But you might need some help!

I have worked with Swedish genealogical research for many years, and have much experience and knowledge when it comes to finding families here in Sweden. In fact, there are few cases where  I have not found a relative in Sweden!  I’m very familiar with Swedish archives, church records, and most important, the Swedish language, the one I grew up with!

An initial consultation - for free!
I'd be happy to hear from you, but please start by reading my newsletters to learn about archives, records and areas of Sweden. Then send me what you know about one of your emigrants, be it your maternal grandmother, mormor,  or paternal grandfather, farfar.

Here is the information that would be useful, if you have it:  

Name and date of birth

Province and parish in Sweden (where born or lived)

The year of emigration and the destination in the US, Canada etc.
 

Travel companions (mainly spouse/children)

Here is an example:
My paternal grandmother (farmor, in Swedish), Anna Strandberg, was born on March 23, 1883, in Växjö, Småland. She emigrated around 1900, alone, to Jamestown, N.Y.


Remember that the names used by your emigrant in an English speaking country usually were different from the ones used in Sweden. Here are some common name changes:

 

English first names

Charles, Charlie
Andrew
Annie
John
Gus
Peter
Ernest
Frank
Henry
Carrie
Mary
Martha
Nels
Swan
Susan
Margaret

 

 

Swedish first names

Karl
Anders
Anna
Johan
Gustaf
Per, Petter
Ernst
Frans
Henrik
Karin
Maria
Märta
Nils
Sven
Susanna
Margareta

 

English last names

Bengston, Benson
Johnson
Peterson, Petersen
Pearson
Lawson
Carlson
Nelson
Swanson

Swedish last names

Bengtsson
Johansson, Jonsson, Jönsson
Pettersson
Persson
Larsson
Karlsson
Nilsson
Svensson


Just send an email, marielouise.bratt@gmail.com, or a letter to Bridge to Sweden, Marie Louise Bratt, Merkuriusvägen 14, 76164 Norrtälje, Sweden, and I'll check the following databases, when appropriate. 

1.      Emigranten, especially Emihamn, based upon the Swedish passenger lists, when people boarded the ship, usually in Göteborg or Malmö. This database is quite complete, but starts only around 1869.

2.      Emibas, an incomplete (unfortunately) database of emigrants, with information taken from the church records. Often very useful when you know the emigrant’s date of birth (if he or she is included, of course)

3.      Sveriges befolkning (Swedish census) from 1880, 1890, 1900, 1910, 1950, 1970, 1980 and 1990

What if I don't find your ancestor in one of the emigration databases, Emigranten or Emibas, nor in the Swedish census records? There are several possible reasons:

First, the name of your emigrant might be the one used in your country, but not in Sweden. As you know, many emigrants changed their names at the time of emigration.

Second, you might not have enough information (no date of birth, no name of the parents etc.). It's true that I might be able to find the person anyhow, especially if the name is unusual. However, if your ancestor's name was Johansson, Andersson or another common name, and there is no date of birth, the search might be complicated, and sometimes impossible.

Conclusion: Try to get a hold of as much information as you possibly can, even if the piece of information does not seem important to you! So send me that sister's name or that strange place name, even if it does not seem correct or relevant.

If this initial search does not give any result, which is possible, I'll give you a price estimate for doing more work. I'll then use any means that I have available to me - many times successfully, but at other times without any results.

More research - for a fee
After this jump start, you might be able to do more research on your own. If you need further help, or don’t have the time for research, I’m available to do it for you.

With enough information from you and our initial research, I can usually find your emigrant's parents and siblings, with dates and places of birth, and their residence(s). You might also be interested in finding out what happened to those siblings who stayed in Sweden (assuming some did), especially if they married and had children, and grandchildren, perhaps alive today! 

What information can you get?
names, dates and places of birth of parents and children
names of all the places (farms, villages, parishes, counties) where the family lived
a full report of all findings
a family tree
copies of the church records used (by email)

Note that it could happen, but rarely, that records are so poor (or simply lacking) that it's impossible to take the research up to the present time.  

 


Useful links for your research (all in English):

About genealogy

Swedes in America

Swedish shopping

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